Posts Tagged Folien Fischer

DNIs, patents, exhaustion and jurisdiction under Lugano: Parainen Pearl v Jebsen Skipsrederi.

A case title which sounds a bit like a Scandinavian crimi – that’s because it almost is. In [2017] EWHC 2570 (Pat) Parainen Pearl et al v Jebsen Skipsrederi et al the facts amounted to claimants, who had purchased a vessel containing a pneumatic cement system patented by defendant (a company domiciled in Norway), seeking a declaration of non-infringement (DNI) of said patent. The purchase was somewhat downstream for the vessel had been sold a number of times before.

Claimants suggested jurisdiction for the UK courts for DNIs relating effectively to the whole of the EEA (at least under their reasoning; the specific countries sought were Sweden and Finland). For the English (and Welsh side of things jurisdiction is established without discussion under Article 5(3) Lugano, forum delicti. Reference was made to Wintersteiger and to Folien Fischer.

Claimants suggested that by the first sale to the original owner, defendants had ‘exhausted’ their intellectual property thus rendering the vessel into a good free to sold across the EEA. Should the court agree with that view, that finding of exhaustion would have to be accepted, still the argument went, across the EEA. Hence, an initial finding of exhaustion, given the need to apply EEA law the same in all EEA Member States, would have to be accepted by all other States and conversely this would give the English courts jurisdiction for pan-EEA DNIs.

Arnold J refers to among others Roche, Actavis v Eli Lilly, Marzillier. He holds that a potential finding by an English court of exhaustion may not necessarily be recognised and enforced by other courts in the EU or indeed EEA: it is not for the UK courts to presume that this will be so (despite their being little room for others in the EEA to refuse to enforce): ‘(Counsel for claimant) argued that.., on a proper application of European law, there could only be one answer as to whether or not the Defendants’ rights under the Patent in respect of the Vessel had been exhausted. In my view, however, it does not follow that it would be proper for this Court to exercise jurisdiction over matters that, under the scheme of the Lugano Convention, lie within the province of the courts of other Contracting States.’

Article 5(3) which works for UK jurisdiction, can then as it were not be used as a joinder-type (Article 6(1) Lugano; Article 8(1) Brussels I Recast) bridgehead for jurisdiction on further claims.

Conclusion: UK courts have no jurisdiction in so far as the DNIs extend beyond the UK designation of the Patent.

Geert.

(Handbook of) EU Private international law, 2nd ed. 2016, Chapter 2, Heading 2.2.11.2.4, Heading 2.2.12.1.

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Negative declarations for tort are covered by Article 5(3) JR – The Court of Justice in Folien Fischer

Does Article 5(3) JR cover an action for declaration as to the non-existence of liability? This was the question in Folien Fischer and it was answered by the ECJ in the affirmative.

Article 5(3) holds a special jurisdictional rule for tort:

A person domiciled in a Member State may, in another Member State, be sued: (…)

3. in matters relating to tort, delict or quasi-delict, in the courts for the place where the harmful event occurred or may occur;

Jurisdiction is established under Article 5(3) for the court of the place where the harmful event occurred ‘or may occur’.

The question on negative declarations for liability in tort was referred for a preliminary ruling by the German Bundesgerichtshof in the course of a dispute between, on the one hand, Folien Fischer AG (‘Folien Fischer’) and Fofitec AG (‘Fofitec’), companies established in Switzerland, and, on the other hand, Ritrama SpA, which has its registered office in Italy. Folien Fischer and Fofitec had been accused of essentially infringement of competition law in their sales practice and in Fofitec’s refusal to grant a license to Ritrama for one of its patents. Ritrama had issued a shot across the bows in sending Folien Fischer a letter alleging the incompatibility with competition law of its commercial practices.

Folien Fischer subsequently took the case to court first, in Hamburg, where it was found to be inadmissible for lack of international jurisdiction. Hamburg had taken its cue from that part of German scholarship which  argued that negative declarations are not covered by Article 5(3), thus leaving Folien Fischer no choice but to seek that declaration in Italy. Upon appeal the issue came before the ECJ.

Unlike Jaaskinen AG, the ECJ itself did not think that the reversal of roles in a negative declaration of liability, merits the non-application of Article 5(3) and the Bier formula. Jaaskinen AG had in so many words suggested that although the Court does not expressly say so in Bier, its holding in that case had a strong whiff about it of protecting the presumed victim, who is generally the claimant in the proceedings. The Court itself laid more emphasis on negative and positive declarations of liability essentially relating to the same matters of law and fact.

Post Bier, the ECJ has had to continue massaging the consequences of that seminal judgment. Bier threatened to open the floodgates to too many potential fora. I believe the Court was wrong in Bier to connect jurisdiction to applicable law (which it did when it found that a variety of fora had ‘natural’ links to the case by virtue of applicable law, or evidence). However follow-up case-law in the meantime (and as often reported on this blog) has taken on large dimensions. Bier /Mines de Potasse now has a large constituency: A complete revisit of the arguments in Bier is probably a tall order (pun intended I fear).

Geert.

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